Coping with Schizophrenia: A Guide for Patients, Families and Caregivers Coping with Schizophrenia: A Guide for Patients, Families and Caregivers

November 14, 2008

coping with schizophrenia

Coping with Schizophrenia: A Guide for Patients, Families and Caregivers is available to buy at Mental Health Books.

This book offers a guide to patients on the road to recovery, with the involvement of family members and caregivers. It offers empowerment and hope to those concerned, and addresses the many troubling obstacles that the diagnosed schizophrenic has to overcome in daily life, such as social isolation and chronic depression, as well as the more recognizably “schizophrenic” attributes such as delusions, hallucinations and hearing voices.

The book’s aim is to combine optimism and hope with realism and practicality, offering insight and sensitivity towards this difficult condition. As with many of the “practical guide” books in mental health, it draws heavily from cognitive therapy, extolling the virtues of crisis management, maintenance and responsibility. The book offers many case studies to provide examples of how the techniques described by Jones and Hayward can be put to practical use.


“This is an excellent [book] and will make a very significant contribution to helping those with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. The book is extremely well written and achieves the difficult feat of combining optimism with realism.”
–Dr. David R. Hemsley, Professor of Abnormal Psychology, Consultant Clinical Psychologist, Institute of Psychiatry, King s College London, UK.

Click here to buy the book through Amazon

Or click here for more books on schizophrenia at Mental Health Books


RD Laing: The Divided Self

October 30, 2008

rd laing the divided self

The Divided Self, the seminal work by eminent Scottish psychiatrist RD Laing, is available to buy at Amazon.

Laing is considered by many to be a founding figure in the anti-psychiatry movement. In this book he postulates that the development of a unified sense of self is essential in cultivating and maintaining a relationship with the outside world. This “ontological security” provides us with the belief that the world is a stable place in which to live, and affirmative of our choice to live there. The “ontologically insecure” person, such as a schizophrenic or psychotic individual, has failed to develop this unity of self, from birth onwards through adolescence and into adult life. It is this insecurity, Laing believed, that distorts the individual’s relationship with the world, to the extent that there is no defence against him or her being “acted on”, or perceived in any way. What is needed, Laing argues, is greater understanding of the gestures and communications of those whom society wrongly ignores and demonises as “mad”.

This book is essential reading for anyone cast with a psychiatric label, or their carers to provide a deeper understanding of what is going on. It is also a great place to start for anyone interested in existentialism, and it’s impact on psychiatry, anti-psychiatry, and psychiatric diagnosis.

Click here to buy The Divided Self at Amazon